How does smoking weed affect fertility - Mello Daily CBD

CBD and Fertility

Journal Back to Archive09.5.19

Have you heard the talk circulating around cannabis and sperm count?

To match the hype growing around all things cannabis, people are offering up information so fast that it’s hard to sift through the pile to separate the facts from the myths.

The Internet has been pumping out claims that smoking weed lowers your sperm count, but, interestingly enough, a recent Harvard study actually produced results proving that theory wrong

“The study found that sperm levels between past and current smokers were relatively similar, but discovered that men who regularly smoked had higher sperm counts than those who have never smoked marijuana.”

Yeah. I know. Shocking.

Maybe this was Judd Apatow’s underlying message when he wrote Knocked Up.

Despite their initially surprised reactions, researchers reluctantly admitted that there actually may be a scientific connection with raising sperm count levels from consuming marijuana.

If THC activates the cannabinoid receptors found in sperm, this could boost their production and even help them become stronger swimmers to reach that golden egg.

And since there are endo-cannabinoids in the female reproductive tract, if you smoke marijuana, the THC would activate those receptors, stimulating the hormones responsible for egg maturation, thus increasing their chances of fertilization, right?

In theory, yes. In reality, we’re not completely sure yet.

Other scientists believe that THC could actually decrease chances of fertilization. 

And believe smoking weed could cause the sperm to become hyperactive, which could prompt them to waste their much-needed energy and minimize their chances for completing the journey to the egg for fertilization. Additionally, smoking too much weed is also rumored to decrease libido, or sex drive.

For females, high levels of marijuana could reduce their chances for fertility by interfering with their reproductive cycle and decreasing their estrogen levels. Without enough estrogen, women cannot ovulate and release eggs for fertilization.

Unfortunately, there is not enough consistent data or evidence that proves either theory right or wrong.

But scientists do agree on one thing: smoking too much marijuana would overstimulate your cannabinoid receptors, which could potentially disrupt your normal routines linked to mood, brain activity, and reproductive system.

If the natural procession of your hormonal levels are being constantly interrupted, scientists believe that it may have a long-term effect, especially if you already have abnormal hormonal levels.

What kind of  long-term effects? Time will only tell.

There’s a reason why these new findings are coming out now; ever since cannabis has reached legal standards, more research can be properly done to unmask the secret benefits that we have yet to figure out.

The biggest takeaway is that we’re learning more about the scientific effects of cannabis and getting closer to deciphering what’s true and false, so this is a great step forward.

So, if you are actively trying to have a baby or are experiencing fertility issues, take a break from THC. Try to avoid ingesting CBD products too, just in case. However, we do encourage the use of CBD topicals because it does help us feel more relaxed and sleep better. With less stress and more energy, these reasons could help couples conceive in the bedroom as well.